LIBRARY NEWS: National Library Week; Lifelong Learning Lectures

As we join American libraries in commemorating National Library Week April 9-13, it seems appropriate to reflect on the wide variety of free fun and educational activities available to you and your families at your Ruby Sisson Library. You can learn about them every week in this Library News column.

One example: The ever popular free spring Lifelong Learning Lectures start today, April 13, and continue every Thursday until May 18 with outstanding talks from 5:30 – 7pm for six weeks.

Today’s opening talk is called “Community Solar vs. Residential Solar: An Affordable Revolution.” Karen Goodwin, Doug Large and Jonathan Dobson will discuss the present realities of going solar in Archuleta County, showing that Pagosa is primed to start something truly meaningful in the field of solar energy. Next Thursday, April 20 lifelong Pagosa resident Holly Metzler will discuss “Climate Reality: Meeting the Challenge Head On,” focusing on the causes and effects of climate change, and what we can do about it. She is currently working on her Masters in Environmental Policy at the University of Denver. Future talks will cover wellness, firearm safety, homebuying tips and spring bouquets.

Pick up a brochure at your library with more information on all of these presentations. They will keep your life interesting and your mind agile. No registration required.

Library loses two full-time staff
April 4 was the last day of work for Michael, our youth services and early literacy librarian, and Rachael, our adult services librarian, who are moving to Boise. Until we replace them, we must temporarily decrease or adjust some of our programming. Please see below for programs that are on as usual and those with changes. Stay tuned to the library website and Facebook for updates on when to expect regular programming to resume. We apologize for any inconvenience or disappointment.

National Poetry Month contest
During the month of April, in honor of National Poetry Month, we’re hosting an ongoing free “found poetry” contest. Anyone can participate, so we hope you will put together a poem and enter to win prizes.

Found poetry refers to a poem that takes words and phrases from another source and puts them together in creative ways to produce a new poem. Examples include bookspine poems, where you stack books and use the book titles to create a poem; remixing, where you rearrange the words from another source to create something new; and blackout poetry, demonstrated at an event next Thursday, April 20 from 4-5:30 p.m. when teens will make a poem by finding words in a page from a book or newspaper.

Just take a picture of your poem and email it to claire@pagosalibrary.org or drop off a hard copy at the library before the end of April. Winners will be announced in early May. No entry fee required.

Medicaid and Connect for Health session
Kevin O’Connor from San Juan Health and Renee Burch from Archuleta County Human Services discuss options and changes to Medicaid and Connect for Health today (Thursday, April 13) in this free session from 1 – 1:45 p.m. No registration required.

All-ages gaming tomorrow
Enjoy free video gaming on the Wii and X-box 360 Kinect with your family and friends tomorrow (Friday, April 14) from 2-3:15 p.m.

Teen fan fiction
Monday, April 17 from 4-5 p.m., teens in the seventh-12th grades are invited to a free Fan Fiction writing event when you’ll be coming up with stories about some of your favorite characters. Note change to Monday because of Lifelong Learning Lectures.

DIY for adults
At this month’s free origami DIY event on Wednesday, April 19 at 1 p.m. we’ll transform an old book into a work of art. No registration required.

Teen gaming
Free teen gaming happens every Tuesday from 4–5:30 p.m. for teens in the 7th-12th grades. Enjoy X-box 360 Kinect, Wii and snacks.

Tech sessions
Drop in with your technology questions for free help on Thursdays from 2-4 p.m. Please note no Tech Time on Tuesdays in April.

Kids storytime becomes playtime
The free Wednesday storytime is cancelled temporarily until we hire a new early literacy librarian. Instead, we will host open playtimes for parents and children to play, interact and learn while enjoying games and puzzles with each other.

Nonfiction
“Cast Iron Paleo” by Pamela Ellgen provides 101 one-pan Paleo recipes. “e Pluribus One” by Sophia A. Nelson offers ways to reclaim out lost compass, civility and codes. “Charleton Heston: Hollywood’s Last Icon” by Marc Eliot is a biography of the actor. “A Colony in a Nation” by Chris Hayes examines the surge in crime that began in the 1960s and peaked in the 1990s. “Arthur and Sherlock” by Michael Sims traces the development of Arthur Conan Doyle as the father of the modern mystery. “Never Out of Season” by Rob Dunn explores how having the food we want all year round threatens our food supply. “Beginning Bookkeeping” by Tanya Phillips gives advice to make your hive thrive. “Dishing Up the Dirt” by Andrea Bemis, owner of an organic vegetable farm in Oregon, shares recipes for cooking through the seasons.

Thrillers, mysteries and suspense
“Pekoe Most Poison” by Laura Shields is a Tea Shop mystery with recipes and tea time tips. “Vicious Circle” by C.J. Box is a Joe Pickett mystery. “The No. 2 Feline Detective Agency” by Mandy Morton is the first book in a new series.

Other novels
“In the Shadow of Denali” is the first book in the new Heart of Alaska series by Kimberly Woodhouse. “The Collapsing Empire” by John Scalzi is an interstellar space-time epic. “Orphans of the Carnival” by Carol Birch tells of two London women a century apart. “Two Good Dogs” by Susan Wilson follows four lost people helped by two good dogs. “All Grown Up” by Jamie Attenberg is a story in comedic vignettes about a 39-year-old single woman and her family. “Edgar & Lucy” by Victor Lodato begins after a young boy survives a terrible accident. “Perfume River” by Pulitzer Prize winner Robert Olen Butler examines family ties and the legacy of the Vietnam War. “Stand Your Ground” by Victoria Christopher Murray focuses on the two mothers of a murdered black teen and his accused killer.

CDs
“In the Name of the Family” by Sarah Dunant is set in Renaissance Italy. “Humans. Bow Down” by James Patterson and Emily Raymond is a fantasy. “The Roman” by Sylvain Reynard is a vampire story. “Aftermath Empire’s End” by Chuck Wendig is a Star wars story. “The Life and Times of Persimmon Wilson” by Nancy Peacock follows an escaped slave. “The Glass Universe” by Dava Sobel is the true story of the major contributions of Harvard women to astronomy. “The Case Against Sugar” by Gary Taubes reveals why sugar is the tobacco of the new millennium. “Wait for Dark” by Kay Hooper is a Bishop/Special Crimes Unit mystery. “Bound Together” by Christine Feehan is a Sea Haven novel.

DVDs
“The Flash” is the complete second season. “The Vikings” stars Kirk Douglas, Tony Curtis, Ernest Borgnine and Janet Leigh. “Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children” is a fantasy adventure. “Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow?” is a romantic comedy.

Free downloadable e-books
Current New York Times bestseller downloadable e-books are being added regularly to our 3M Cloud Library. Access these e-books by clicking on the 3M Cloud Library icon on the home page of our website. While there, browse through a multitude of other adult, juvenile and children’s books, both bestsellers and classics in many genres.

Free downloadable films
For your viewing pleasure, we offer IndieFlix, a streaming movie service that gives you unlimited access to more than 7,500 award-winning and popular independent shorts, feature films and documentaries from more than 50 countries – on your device, PC or Mac, with no apps needed. Access IndieFlix through the Downloadable Content icon on the library’s website. Use “Quick Pick,” the discovery tool that lets you sample movies like you would music.

Thanks to our donors
For books and materials this week we thank Barry Smith, EarthVision Institute and our anonymous donors. We also are grateful for the generous donation of Suzy and Roy Horvath in memory of Don English.

Quotable Quote
“There is evidence that curiosity has longevity benefits. Asking questions and discovering new things keeps you engaged with the world and with other people.” – Laura L. Carstensen, professor of psychology and public policy at Stanford University and director of the Stanford Longevity Center.

Website
For more information on library books, services and programs – and to reserve books, e-books, CDs and DVDs from the comfort of your home – please visit our website at http://pagosa.colibraries.org/

Share

Carole Howard & Library Staff

The Ruby Sisson Memorial Library has been located at 811 San Juan Street (corner of S. 8th and Hwy 160) since 1989. The library is overseen by the Upper San Juan Library District, a tax-funded special district in Archuleta County.